Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Women's History Month Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries



Cartographic Celebration of Women’s History Month

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) on the second floor of Bracken Library is celebrating Women’s History Month with a public presentation in downtown Muncie.  Mapping Notable Women around the World will be presented at the Cornerstone Center for the Arts (520 East Main Street) on Wednesday, March 29 from 6:00 to 7:00 in the Colonnade Room.

The presentation will feature maps depicting the lives of amazing women around the world and in Muncie, and women often overlooked by history books are highlighted:  A map about the life of civil rights activist Fannie Harmer (above, click to enlarge) identifies important places and events in her life.  And a map about fashion designer Ann Cole Lowe, who was the un-credited creator of Jacqueline Kennedy’s wedding gown, will be included.  Also included is the featured “Map of the Month” in the GRMC on the second floor of Bracken Library--a map about Indiana native Margaret Hamilton, who wrote the computer code for the Apollo space missions.

The presentation will also feature maps about women’s issues around the world.  Maps identifying education and employment inequality, women in government, healthcare issues, and discrimination and advancements in society will be shown.  And photographs from the Libraries’ digital archives will be incorporated.

The GRMC created a special collection of online maps for Women’s History Month available from the Libraries’ Cardinal Scholar institutional repository.  These include maps about women working in agriculture, female heads of state, women in tertiary teaching, and even the travels of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  (Type “women in the world map” in the search box to access the available cartographic resources).

The presentation is open to the public and suitable for all ages.  Free parking is available.  For more information, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Ireland Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries
















St. Patrick’s Home:  Ireland Maps in Bracken Library

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) has extensive cartographic resources about Ireland.  The collection includes convenient travel maps of Dublin and other cities, geological maps of Ireland, rivers, peat maps, glacial landforms, fishing resources, and cultural maps depicting Irish family names and coats of arms.

Historical maps of Ireland are also available in the GRMC and from the Atlas Collection.  Atlas of Irish History was published by Methuen and includes maps about invasions of Ireland (above, click to enlarge), battle sites, and historic families.  Atlas of Ireland was published by the Irish National Committee for Geography.  This atlas includes maps about soils, geomorphology, flora and fauna, manufacturing, settlement and population maps, and society and culture.

The Atlas Collection on the second floor of Bracken Library also includes Atlas of the Great Irish Famine, Frommer’s Road Atlas, The Ordnance Survey Road Atlas of Ireland, Blaeu’s Atlas of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland, and an atlas called The Hennessy Brandy Dublin Street Finder.  Atlases circulate for 28 days or longer.

The GRMC created a cartographic guide for finding resources in the Libraries.  Users can also access the Libraries’ Digital Media Repository and Cardinal Scholar for more maps of Ireland.

For more information, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.


Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Black History Month Maps Program in Muncie



Hidden Figures: Black History Month Maps Program in Muncie

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) will be presenting a program featuring maps celebrating Black History Month.  The program will be on Tuesday, February 28 from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. at the Cornerstone Center for the Arts in downtown Muncie.

The class, Hidden Figures: Celebrating the Untold Stories of Black History, will feature custom maps created by the GRMC.  The maps depict the lives of some of the lesser known figures and events in African American history, including maps about civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer (above, click to enlarge), fashion designer Ann Lowe, the civil rights movement in Indiana, the use of the popular “Green Books,” and the life of Muncie leader Hurley Goodall.

The class is free and open to the public.  The Cornerstone Center for the Arts is located at 520 East Main Street, and the program is in the Colonnade Room.  Free parking is available on the north side of the building.


For more information, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Monday, February 13, 2017

North Korea Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries

CNN map of North Korea missile launch




Maps in the News:  North Korea and the Sea of Japan, or Is It the East Sea?

North Korea tested a reported new ballistic missile on Sunday evening, a violation of a United Nations Security Council resolution banning missile launches by the nation.  News reports state that the missile traveled about 300 miles before landing in the Sea of Japan.

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) includes a large collection maps of the Korean Peninsula, including North and South Korea separately and historically as one nation.  

A map of North Korea is available in the International Historic Maps Collection of the Digital Media Repository.  The map is published in the Russian language in 1912.

The Sea of Japan is also included in maps instructional sessions given by the GRMC as part of the study of place name disputes.  The “Sea of Japan” is the name of the body of water between the Korean Peninsula and the islands of Japan.  The Japanese government supports the use of the name “Sea of Japan.”  The governments of North Korea and South Korea support the use of the name “East Sea” for the same body of water. 

The international governing body for the naming of bodies of water rejected the Korean claim and officially use the name “Sea of Japan.”  However, most maps include both names—usually with “East Sea” listed in parenthesis.  Maps published by the Korean governments, though, list only “East Sea” for the name of the water (above).

The Atlas Collection on the second floor of Bracken Library also includes several resources about the Korean Peninsula.  East Sea in Old Western Maps is an atlas published by the Korean Overseas Information Service in Seoul in 2004 for “The Society for East Sea.”  The book includes historic maps that label the neighboring body of water as the “East Sea” and includes a chapter arguing the historical points for using the name:  “Six libraries’ map collections in this study…” confirm that “appellations like ‘East Sea,’ ‘Oriental Sea,’ ‘Sea of Korea’…had been in much wider use than ‘Sea of Japan’ from the 16th century through the mid-19th.”


Maps from the GRMC are available for circulation for two weeks or longer.  And atlases circulate for 28 days or longer.


Thursday, February 02, 2017

Celebrating Black History Month with Maps





Black History Month:  Map of Moments that Changed the World

On this day in 1865, President Abraham Lincoln signed the 13th Amendment outlawing slavery in the United States.  The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) has created a new custom map in celebration of Black History Month to commemorate the 13th Amendment and other important people and events.  Black History: Moments that Changed the World is a map based on the book 28 Days: Moments in Black History that Changed the World by Charles R. Smith, Jr. featuring illustrations by Shane W. Evans and The Atlas of African-American History by James Ciment.

The map (excerpt above, click to enlarge) features some of the watershed moments in African-American history.  The map identifies the location of the birthplace of Harriet Tubman, a conductor on the Underground Railroad and spy during the Civil War.  Chicago is featured on the map as the hometown of President Barack Obama and Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, who opened the first African American-owned hospital in the country.

The GRMC also has custom maps about the Negro League Baseball teams, the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., millionaire businesswoman Madam C.J. Walker, and a map about the life of Sojourner Truth.  The maps are available for circulation from the GRMC and may be used for classroom research and exhibits.


A subject guide identifying African-American cartographic resources is also available from the GRMC.  For more information about using cartographic resources in the study of Black History, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.  

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Immigration Maps in the News



Maps in the News: Mapping United States Immigration

The Ball State University Libraries GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) provides research assistance for students writing papers and presentations.  Staff in the GRMC conduct instructional sessions for professors to introduce students to using cartographic resources as a primary source.  Students (and other researchers) can learn about the vast world of maps, atlases, and other cartographic resources.

Many Web pages feature unique maps that portray geographic trends and depict current world issues in a truly visual format.  One site used by the GRMC for research projects is Metrocosm.  Metrocosm is a collection of maps created by Max Galka, an entrepreneur and computer engineer.  These unique maps provide dynamic depictions of numerous topics.  The latest maps on the site describe the flow of international trade, show election results in 3-D, map the waste management of New York City, and show traffic patterns across the United States.

One of the maps used by the GRMC in recent current events presentations is “Here’s Everyone Who’s Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820: Two Centuries of U.S. Immigration.”  According to the site, 79 million people obtained lawful permanent resident status in the United States from 1820 to 2013, and the map shows their migration patterns.  On the map, each dot represents 10,000 people. A timeline at the bottom of the map shows which countries had the most people migrating to the U.S, so users can track events that influenced migration--like the Irish Potato Famine (above, click to enlarge).  The top three countries for each decade and the total number of people migrating are listed in the corner.

Another popular map is “All the World’s Immigration Visualized in One Map.”  This map shows the inflows and outflows of immigration by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015.


For more information about using maps as a visual aid in research and learning, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Holiday Hours at the Ball State University Libraries


The Ball State University Libraries GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) will be closed on Monday, January 16 in honor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.  The GRMC will reopen on Tuesday at 8:00 am.